THE FUTURE OF FOOD

by Tess Prince September 2016 CHECK OUT IBIZA Read in PDF format N12/2016
THE FUTURE OF FOOD By the year 2050 the planet will be packed with nine billion people. The global livestock industry already takes an enormous toll on the environment and with rising food prices plus an ever-growing population, it will mean we will all have to rethink the way we eat…

Lab grown meat

Meat prices are anticipated to have a huge impact on our diets. Food industry experts estimate they could double in the next five to seven years, making meat a luxury item. Growing meat in a lab rather than slaughtering animals is a more efficient and environmentally friendly way of putting meat on our plates. Dutch scientists have used stem cells taken from cows and have successfully produced strips of muscle tissue known as ‘In-vitro meat’ (said to resemble calamari). It is recreated with the correct composition of protein, fat tissue and added nutrients with the edible muscle tissue which is ground down to produce the consistency of minced meat. So we could be seeing ‘test-tube burgers’ in the not too distant future!

Marine algae

With 10,000 types of seaweed on the planet, algae could be a solution to the world’s food stortages. The great thing is that it grows at a phenomenal rate, the fastest growing plant on earth. Big food industry players predict algae farming could become the world’s biggest cropping industry - Japan already has huge seaweed farms. We have already seen dulse trending on social media as a vegan alternative to bacon!

Insects

A considerable proportion of the world’s population already eats insects - crickets are eaten in Thailand, wasps are a delicacy in Japan and caterpillars and locusts are popular in Africa. Insects are likely to be a staple of our future diets, packed full of protein and rich in essential micronutrients such as iron and zinc. They don’t need as much space as livestock, consume less water and do not have much of a carbon footprint. Ground insects could also replace some of the expensive ingredients that are fed to farm animals - we have already seen René Redzepi, chef and co-owner of Noma, serving insects on the menu. It won’t be long until we see an insect aisle in the supermarkets!

Aquaponics

Urban farms are cropping up in unused spaces in major capital cities to produce year-round sustainable harvests of fresh, leafy vegetables and fish. Free from chemical fertilisers or pesticides, aquaponic technology is an efficient and environmentally friendly system of farming fish and plants together. Fish are kept in large tanks where plants are grown without soil. Nutrient-rich fish poo is then pumped to the plant beds where micro bacteria fertilise the plants. In return, the plants naturally purify the water for the fish! A win win win!

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